testing header
Math Goodies is a free math help portal for students, teachers, and parents.
Free Math
Newsletter
 
 
Interactive Math Goodies Software

Buy Math Goodies Software
testing left nav
Math Forums @ Math Goodies
Math Forums @ Math Goodies
Home | Profile | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Homework Help Forums
 Geometry and Trigonometry
 geometry
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

effort
Senior Member

USA
38 Posts

Posted - 02/16/2012 :  13:33:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Smith, Jones, and Rodriquez are the engineer, brakeman, and fireman on a train not necessarily in that order.

Riding on the train are three passengers with the same last names as the crewmembers identified as passenger Smith, passenger Jones, and passenger Rodriquez.

The brakeman lives in Denver. Passenger Rodriquez lives in San Francisco. Passenger Jones long ago forgot all the algebra that he learned in high school. The passenger with the same name as the brakeman lives in New York. The brakeman and one of the passengers, a professor of mathematical physics, attend the same health club. Smith beat the fireman in a game of tennis at a court near their homes. Discover a theorem that tells the name of the engineer, the brakeman, and the fireman.


I don't know what theorem this could possibly be. I think I found the identity of each. Jones is the brakesman, Smith is the engineer, and Rodriquez is the fireman. I just made a chart with the given information. Is my answer correct? Can someone show me how to prove the answer using a geomtry theorem?
Go to Top of Page

Ultraglide
Advanced Member

Canada
299 Posts

Posted - 02/18/2012 :  16:14:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One name for this type of puzzle, is Quizzle. There is a picture of a Quizzle book at this address.
http://www.amazon.com/Quizzles-Problem-Puzzles-Wayne-Williams/dp/0866511024

The only geometry I can see is a grid pictured on the cover of the book.
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Math Forums @ Math Goodies © 2000-2004 Snitz Communications Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.03 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000
testing footer
About Us | Contact Us | Advertise with Us | Facebook | Blog | Recommend This Page




Copyright © 1998-2014 Mrs. Glosser's Math Goodies. All Rights Reserved.

A Hotchalk/Glam Partner Site - Last Modified 28 Nov 2014